Church Road Well Field Project

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Community Updates – Granthams Water Treatment Plant (WTP): Placement of New Customized Storage Container
Updated May 27, 2024

As we prepare to meet the summer water needs of the Chapman Water System, it will be necessary to activate the Granthams Water Treatment Plant (WTP). To do this, the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) will need to temporarily locate the shipping container onsite in the original proposed location.

Please understand that this will be on a temporary basis to ensure the operation of the water treatment plant for the summer. The SCRD has heard the concerns from community members but requires time to organize and present an alternative permanent solution.

The location of the container and activation of the Grathams Water Treatment Plant will be subject to SCRD’s decisions around progression from Stage 1 to Stage 2 restrictions. A further update will be provided once an installation date is confirmed.

In the meantime, we appreciate your understanding of this temporary measure while the WTP remains in operation.


Previous Update: April 19, 2024
The SCRD is aware of community concerns related to the placement of a storage container at Granthams WTP. The chemical being stored in the container is vital to ensuring the safe distribution of water from this source.In the summer months, during peak community demand, Church Road well field and Granthams Water Treatment Plant, will provide essential drinking water to more than 5,000 residents that rely on the Chapman Water System.

Lots more information can be found on right panel including a Frequently Asked Questions document and links to community information sessions which took place in late March 2024.




Project Construction Information

Construction work on the Church Road Well Field began in March 2022. This project will add up to 4.6 million litres of water per day to the Chapman Water System and is a significant step forward in securing water supply for the Sunshine Coast.

On June 30, 2023 the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) was given the green light (“Leave to Commence”) by the Ministry of Forests to begin operating the Church Road Well, a final water licence was issued by the province and all conditions have been satisfied.

SCRD has awarded a compliance monitoring contract for necessary creek and well monitoring over the next two years.

The completion of this project will contribute up to 4.6 million litres of water per day to the Chapman Water System during the dry months and is a significant step forward in securing water supply for the Sunshine Coast.



On the right

Find answers to frequently asked about questions about this project and the impact of construction on the local area

See a timeline for the project

Sign up for updates on this project as it progresses

Find links to further information on this project

Below

Ask questions about the project



Community Updates – Granthams Water Treatment Plant (WTP): Placement of New Customized Storage Container
Updated May 27, 2024

As we prepare to meet the summer water needs of the Chapman Water System, it will be necessary to activate the Granthams Water Treatment Plant (WTP). To do this, the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) will need to temporarily locate the shipping container onsite in the original proposed location.

Please understand that this will be on a temporary basis to ensure the operation of the water treatment plant for the summer. The SCRD has heard the concerns from community members but requires time to organize and present an alternative permanent solution.

The location of the container and activation of the Grathams Water Treatment Plant will be subject to SCRD’s decisions around progression from Stage 1 to Stage 2 restrictions. A further update will be provided once an installation date is confirmed.

In the meantime, we appreciate your understanding of this temporary measure while the WTP remains in operation.


Previous Update: April 19, 2024
The SCRD is aware of community concerns related to the placement of a storage container at Granthams WTP. The chemical being stored in the container is vital to ensuring the safe distribution of water from this source.In the summer months, during peak community demand, Church Road well field and Granthams Water Treatment Plant, will provide essential drinking water to more than 5,000 residents that rely on the Chapman Water System.

Lots more information can be found on right panel including a Frequently Asked Questions document and links to community information sessions which took place in late March 2024.




Project Construction Information

Construction work on the Church Road Well Field began in March 2022. This project will add up to 4.6 million litres of water per day to the Chapman Water System and is a significant step forward in securing water supply for the Sunshine Coast.

On June 30, 2023 the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) was given the green light (“Leave to Commence”) by the Ministry of Forests to begin operating the Church Road Well, a final water licence was issued by the province and all conditions have been satisfied.

SCRD has awarded a compliance monitoring contract for necessary creek and well monitoring over the next two years.

The completion of this project will contribute up to 4.6 million litres of water per day to the Chapman Water System during the dry months and is a significant step forward in securing water supply for the Sunshine Coast.



On the right

Find answers to frequently asked about questions about this project and the impact of construction on the local area

See a timeline for the project

Sign up for updates on this project as it progresses

Find links to further information on this project

Below

Ask questions about the project


Have a question about this project? Ask it here!

Questions will be reviewed by SCRD staff and posted with answers.

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  • Share Can the sodium hypochlorite and/or the storage unit be removed from site while the pump is not in operation (over the winter)? on Facebook Share Can the sodium hypochlorite and/or the storage unit be removed from site while the pump is not in operation (over the winter)? on Twitter Share Can the sodium hypochlorite and/or the storage unit be removed from site while the pump is not in operation (over the winter)? on Linkedin Email Can the sodium hypochlorite and/or the storage unit be removed from site while the pump is not in operation (over the winter)? link

    Can the sodium hypochlorite and/or the storage unit be removed from site while the pump is not in operation (over the winter)?

    3 months ago

    Update: This answer was updated on June 20, 2024.

    Updated answer: The storage container will remain in place while the facility is in operation to meet community water needs. Typically this is from Stage 2 through to the return to Stage 1 water conservation regulations.

    Why was this answer updated? When the original answer was provided to this question the intent was to have the container at the Water Treatment Plant on a more permanent basis, however following community conversations, it was decided to temporarily place the container on site for as long as it’s needed.

    Original answer from April 9, 2024 : The storage unit cannot be removed as the electrical, communication and sodium hypochlorite supply lines will be hard wired into the plant and reinstalling and decommissioning this annually will be extremely cumbersome and costly. Additionally, should any other water source unexpectedly become unavailable, or any emergency situation arise, Church Road would need to be utilized and put online at a moment's notice. 

  • Share You stated on the "let's talk" website that the Church Road Well Field project has been completed. Why are you continuing to ad to the site then? A chemical storage Sea Can sitting on the roadway was never mentioned until March 23, 2024. This roadway, Reed Road and Elphinstone Ave is like a downhill ski coarse after a snowfall. Is it impossible for you to imagine a vehicle losing control and hitting your Sodium Hypochlorite Sea Can? My parked car was hit by a snowplow during the winter of 2022 just up from Reed Road, no more than 100 meters from the new Granthams Landing Water Treatment Plant. on Facebook Share You stated on the "let's talk" website that the Church Road Well Field project has been completed. Why are you continuing to ad to the site then? A chemical storage Sea Can sitting on the roadway was never mentioned until March 23, 2024. This roadway, Reed Road and Elphinstone Ave is like a downhill ski coarse after a snowfall. Is it impossible for you to imagine a vehicle losing control and hitting your Sodium Hypochlorite Sea Can? My parked car was hit by a snowplow during the winter of 2022 just up from Reed Road, no more than 100 meters from the new Granthams Landing Water Treatment Plant. on Twitter Share You stated on the "let's talk" website that the Church Road Well Field project has been completed. Why are you continuing to ad to the site then? A chemical storage Sea Can sitting on the roadway was never mentioned until March 23, 2024. This roadway, Reed Road and Elphinstone Ave is like a downhill ski coarse after a snowfall. Is it impossible for you to imagine a vehicle losing control and hitting your Sodium Hypochlorite Sea Can? My parked car was hit by a snowplow during the winter of 2022 just up from Reed Road, no more than 100 meters from the new Granthams Landing Water Treatment Plant. on Linkedin Email You stated on the "let's talk" website that the Church Road Well Field project has been completed. Why are you continuing to ad to the site then? A chemical storage Sea Can sitting on the roadway was never mentioned until March 23, 2024. This roadway, Reed Road and Elphinstone Ave is like a downhill ski coarse after a snowfall. Is it impossible for you to imagine a vehicle losing control and hitting your Sodium Hypochlorite Sea Can? My parked car was hit by a snowplow during the winter of 2022 just up from Reed Road, no more than 100 meters from the new Granthams Landing Water Treatment Plant. link

    You stated on the "let's talk" website that the Church Road Well Field project has been completed. Why are you continuing to ad to the site then? A chemical storage Sea Can sitting on the roadway was never mentioned until March 23, 2024. This roadway, Reed Road and Elphinstone Ave is like a downhill ski coarse after a snowfall. Is it impossible for you to imagine a vehicle losing control and hitting your Sodium Hypochlorite Sea Can? My parked car was hit by a snowplow during the winter of 2022 just up from Reed Road, no more than 100 meters from the new Granthams Landing Water Treatment Plant.

    davidpollard asked 3 months ago

    The need to store sodium hypochlorite was always known, unfortunately the space required for the material was underestimated earlier in the design process. Please see the proposed location map that was provided on the Let’s Talk page on March 28, 2024: Location MapThe SCRD’s preferred location of installation is well protected by the Water Treatment Plant building and large yellow steel parking gate. This location, while located in the right of way for the MOTI road, is the corner of the parking lot located safely away from road hazards.  The container has secondary spill containment to prevent leaks.  

     

    A community information session was held on Wednesday, March 28. In case you were unable to attend, please see below links to the presentation and a recording of the meeting, also available to be viewed on the Church Road Let’s Talk page: 

  • Share I am against parking an unsightly container near Soames Park for the storage of sodium hypochlorite. This should be stored at an industrial site, such as eg next to your office off Field/Solar Road Wilsons Creek and certainly not near Soames Park or the road leading to it. Alternatively, as I assume it will be added to SCRD drinking water at the new pump house at Fisher & Elphinstone, in it's parking lot. Better yet, do away with it all together, as nobody wants bleach tasting drinking water, also solves prickly storage issues. Thanks for your consideration. on Facebook Share I am against parking an unsightly container near Soames Park for the storage of sodium hypochlorite. This should be stored at an industrial site, such as eg next to your office off Field/Solar Road Wilsons Creek and certainly not near Soames Park or the road leading to it. Alternatively, as I assume it will be added to SCRD drinking water at the new pump house at Fisher & Elphinstone, in it's parking lot. Better yet, do away with it all together, as nobody wants bleach tasting drinking water, also solves prickly storage issues. Thanks for your consideration. on Twitter Share I am against parking an unsightly container near Soames Park for the storage of sodium hypochlorite. This should be stored at an industrial site, such as eg next to your office off Field/Solar Road Wilsons Creek and certainly not near Soames Park or the road leading to it. Alternatively, as I assume it will be added to SCRD drinking water at the new pump house at Fisher & Elphinstone, in it's parking lot. Better yet, do away with it all together, as nobody wants bleach tasting drinking water, also solves prickly storage issues. Thanks for your consideration. on Linkedin Email I am against parking an unsightly container near Soames Park for the storage of sodium hypochlorite. This should be stored at an industrial site, such as eg next to your office off Field/Solar Road Wilsons Creek and certainly not near Soames Park or the road leading to it. Alternatively, as I assume it will be added to SCRD drinking water at the new pump house at Fisher & Elphinstone, in it's parking lot. Better yet, do away with it all together, as nobody wants bleach tasting drinking water, also solves prickly storage issues. Thanks for your consideration. link

    I am against parking an unsightly container near Soames Park for the storage of sodium hypochlorite. This should be stored at an industrial site, such as eg next to your office off Field/Solar Road Wilsons Creek and certainly not near Soames Park or the road leading to it. Alternatively, as I assume it will be added to SCRD drinking water at the new pump house at Fisher & Elphinstone, in it's parking lot. Better yet, do away with it all together, as nobody wants bleach tasting drinking water, also solves prickly storage issues. Thanks for your consideration.

    Nick V asked 3 months ago

    Please see the proposed location map that was provided on the Let’s Talk page on March 28, 2024: Location Map. All SCRD water sources are disinfected with sodium hypochlorite. This chemical is stored at each water source in an amount based on the volume of water produced to ensure continued  uninterrupted operation of the facilities.  

    A community information session was held on Wednesday, March 28. In case you were unable to attend, please see below links to the presentation and a recording of the meeting, also available to be viewed on the Church Road Let’s Talk page: 

  • Share Additional Questions: 1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate. 2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay? 3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it? 4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution. 5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled. 6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much? on Facebook Share Additional Questions: 1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate. 2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay? 3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it? 4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution. 5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled. 6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much? on Twitter Share Additional Questions: 1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate. 2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay? 3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it? 4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution. 5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled. 6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much? on Linkedin Email Additional Questions: 1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate. 2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay? 3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it? 4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution. 5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled. 6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much? link

    Additional Questions: 1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate. 2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay? 3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it? 4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution. 5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled. 6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much?

    Sean asked 4 months ago

    Additional Questions: 

    1. Your presentation says that Sodium Hypochlorite is not considered a "dangerous good" under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act yet on the Transportation of Dangerous goods website (https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2001-286/page-27.html) it states that the quantity must be under 20L or 20KG. The quantity you are proposing is in the THOUSANDS of liters/kilograms. I find this statement very misleading. Please elaborate.

    The regulation linked to in this question pertains to Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations - Part 12 - Domestic Transport by Aircraft, and is not relevant to ground transportation and deliveries.

    2. Could you please share the report with me where WorksafeBC states that your storage of 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite was okay?

    Requests of this nature should be submitted to https://www.scrd.ca/freedom-of-information/ 

    3. The purpose of installing this 20ft long shipping container is to reduce the quantities of deliveries so it is "safer"? You are telling everyone in this neighborhood that this is a safe product and that it is not considered a "dangerous good" so please elaborate on this. I am confused. Is this a safe product or isn't it?

    Yes, reducing the frequency of handling and transporting the product reduces the risks to staff and public. Sodium Hypochlorite if used and handled correctly is safe and poses little, if any, risk.

    4. Regardless of whether you're storing the barrels in the WTP existing building or in this new shipping container you will still need to transport and load in the barrels. How is this done and why can't this just be done more frequently into the existing water treatment plant building? If the idea is to be SAFER I think storing a lesser amount in our densely populated neighbourhood is the safest solution.

    Sodium Hypochlorite deliveries will come via delivery trucks to site.  Materials will be loaded into the container where they will be stored safely over the spill containment system. If stored properly, Sodium Hypochlorite does not pose a risk to the public.

    5. Please explain further how the venting will work. Are you venting Sodium Hypochlorite vapours into my neighborhood? My house is right next door and the vapours are harmful to humans if inhaled.

    Ventilation is in place to ensure both the temperature remains stable and the parts per million (PPM) never reaches a concentration that is hazardous to staff entering the container.  The even lower PPM that would be present exterior to the container, once mixed with fresh air will not pose a hazard to public.

    6. You already committed to the landscaping as proposed but cancelled it. Now you are saying you are recommitting to it? Why is it different now? You also didn't answer my question about what the quotes were that you received. Could you please let us know what the bids were that you received to implement the proposed salal, juniper, sword fern, etc. and for how much?

    Requests of this nature should be submitted to https://www.scrd.ca/freedom-of-information/

  • Share I would also like to know why Sodium Hypochlorite 10.8% isn't being used anymore. Perhaps the math isn't this simple but if you use 10.8% and have 2 barrels of it the WTP wouldn't you need nearly 1/2 the deliveries as opposed to using 6%? Why the switch? I would also like to know why such an enormous container is being used? Why not store only 2-4 additional barrels in a 10x10 structure in the driveway on the west side of the WTP. Less barrels = less concern for the public and it would allow for storage in a less obtrusive area that is further away from homes. on Facebook Share I would also like to know why Sodium Hypochlorite 10.8% isn't being used anymore. Perhaps the math isn't this simple but if you use 10.8% and have 2 barrels of it the WTP wouldn't you need nearly 1/2 the deliveries as opposed to using 6%? Why the switch? I would also like to know why such an enormous container is being used? Why not store only 2-4 additional barrels in a 10x10 structure in the driveway on the west side of the WTP. Less barrels = less concern for the public and it would allow for storage in a less obtrusive area that is further away from homes. on Twitter Share I would also like to know why Sodium Hypochlorite 10.8% isn't being used anymore. Perhaps the math isn't this simple but if you use 10.8% and have 2 barrels of it the WTP wouldn't you need nearly 1/2 the deliveries as opposed to using 6%? Why the switch? I would also like to know why such an enormous container is being used? Why not store only 2-4 additional barrels in a 10x10 structure in the driveway on the west side of the WTP. Less barrels = less concern for the public and it would allow for storage in a less obtrusive area that is further away from homes. on Linkedin Email I would also like to know why Sodium Hypochlorite 10.8% isn't being used anymore. Perhaps the math isn't this simple but if you use 10.8% and have 2 barrels of it the WTP wouldn't you need nearly 1/2 the deliveries as opposed to using 6%? Why the switch? I would also like to know why such an enormous container is being used? Why not store only 2-4 additional barrels in a 10x10 structure in the driveway on the west side of the WTP. Less barrels = less concern for the public and it would allow for storage in a less obtrusive area that is further away from homes. link

    I would also like to know why Sodium Hypochlorite 10.8% isn't being used anymore. Perhaps the math isn't this simple but if you use 10.8% and have 2 barrels of it the WTP wouldn't you need nearly 1/2 the deliveries as opposed to using 6%? Why the switch? I would also like to know why such an enormous container is being used? Why not store only 2-4 additional barrels in a 10x10 structure in the driveway on the west side of the WTP. Less barrels = less concern for the public and it would allow for storage in a less obtrusive area that is further away from homes.

    Sean asked 4 months ago

    After initial operations and analysis of operating data collected, it was determined this was the reliable concentration for optimal operation of the equipment within the water treatment plant. The storage container was sized and designed prior to this change. Ideally we would have had more storage onsite to ensure uninterrupted operations, however staff deemed a larger container to be too costly and impactful. 

  • Share If there was a Sodium Hypochlorite spill during delivery at the Church Well pump house, how would this be handled? Would clean up require a hazmat team and if so, how long would it take for them to respond? If not, how would the spill be cleaned up? On a further note, it strikes me that the backup generator is fairly exposed in the case of a vehicle running off the road at the corner of Fisher and Reed. Has any thought been given to putting any protection (e.g concrete blocks) along the corner above it)? on Facebook Share If there was a Sodium Hypochlorite spill during delivery at the Church Well pump house, how would this be handled? Would clean up require a hazmat team and if so, how long would it take for them to respond? If not, how would the spill be cleaned up? On a further note, it strikes me that the backup generator is fairly exposed in the case of a vehicle running off the road at the corner of Fisher and Reed. Has any thought been given to putting any protection (e.g concrete blocks) along the corner above it)? on Twitter Share If there was a Sodium Hypochlorite spill during delivery at the Church Well pump house, how would this be handled? Would clean up require a hazmat team and if so, how long would it take for them to respond? If not, how would the spill be cleaned up? On a further note, it strikes me that the backup generator is fairly exposed in the case of a vehicle running off the road at the corner of Fisher and Reed. Has any thought been given to putting any protection (e.g concrete blocks) along the corner above it)? on Linkedin Email If there was a Sodium Hypochlorite spill during delivery at the Church Well pump house, how would this be handled? Would clean up require a hazmat team and if so, how long would it take for them to respond? If not, how would the spill be cleaned up? On a further note, it strikes me that the backup generator is fairly exposed in the case of a vehicle running off the road at the corner of Fisher and Reed. Has any thought been given to putting any protection (e.g concrete blocks) along the corner above it)? link

    If there was a Sodium Hypochlorite spill during delivery at the Church Well pump house, how would this be handled? Would clean up require a hazmat team and if so, how long would it take for them to respond? If not, how would the spill be cleaned up? On a further note, it strikes me that the backup generator is fairly exposed in the case of a vehicle running off the road at the corner of Fisher and Reed. Has any thought been given to putting any protection (e.g concrete blocks) along the corner above it)?

    SCRD Water Strategy asked 3 months ago

    If a spill were to occur outside the storage containers spill containment, the parking lot would contain the materials and the de-chlorination pucks would react with any material that drained to the manhole in the parking lot. Spill kits are also located onsite.

    Regarding traffic risks, the SCRD has taken this under advisement and is assessing any need for additional protection.

  • Share We live near the station. Please can you share a map indicating precisely where the material will be stored? Thanks on Facebook Share We live near the station. Please can you share a map indicating precisely where the material will be stored? Thanks on Twitter Share We live near the station. Please can you share a map indicating precisely where the material will be stored? Thanks on Linkedin Email We live near the station. Please can you share a map indicating precisely where the material will be stored? Thanks link

    We live near the station. Please can you share a map indicating precisely where the material will be stored? Thanks

    Mary asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Please see the location below:

  • Share The SCRD is planning on placing a 20ft long shipping container at the corner of Fisher Rd. and Elphinstone Ave. It sits atop the hill at the pinnacle of Historic Grantham's Landing and in view of nearly all 100 homes in our precious neighborhood. It is on MOTI land and not contained within the property of 850 Fisher Rd. Inside this shipping there will be hundreds of gallons of the industrial chemical Sodium Hypochlorite. Needless to say, there is outrage in the neighborhood after learning about this plan on Friday, just days before the installation was to take place. There was an impromptu SCRD meeting tonight that was put together in an attempt to quell the outrage in my neighborhood by some of the residents who have been made aware. I have made several attempts to contact the SCRD for answers to my questions regarding this plan which shows so little regard for my community. There, simply, was not enough time given in the meeting to answer all the questions and the answers that were given did not satiate my concerns over safety and preservation of my neighborhood. Here are some additional questions I have after tonight's meeting: New questions regarding Safety: 1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system. 2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 3. What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 4. You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and Worksafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe? 5. Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected? 6. What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? Other: 1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along? 2. What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St? 3. Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are. 4. There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive? on Facebook Share The SCRD is planning on placing a 20ft long shipping container at the corner of Fisher Rd. and Elphinstone Ave. It sits atop the hill at the pinnacle of Historic Grantham's Landing and in view of nearly all 100 homes in our precious neighborhood. It is on MOTI land and not contained within the property of 850 Fisher Rd. Inside this shipping there will be hundreds of gallons of the industrial chemical Sodium Hypochlorite. Needless to say, there is outrage in the neighborhood after learning about this plan on Friday, just days before the installation was to take place. There was an impromptu SCRD meeting tonight that was put together in an attempt to quell the outrage in my neighborhood by some of the residents who have been made aware. I have made several attempts to contact the SCRD for answers to my questions regarding this plan which shows so little regard for my community. There, simply, was not enough time given in the meeting to answer all the questions and the answers that were given did not satiate my concerns over safety and preservation of my neighborhood. Here are some additional questions I have after tonight's meeting: New questions regarding Safety: 1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system. 2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 3. What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 4. You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and Worksafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe? 5. Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected? 6. What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? Other: 1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along? 2. What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St? 3. Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are. 4. There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive? on Twitter Share The SCRD is planning on placing a 20ft long shipping container at the corner of Fisher Rd. and Elphinstone Ave. It sits atop the hill at the pinnacle of Historic Grantham's Landing and in view of nearly all 100 homes in our precious neighborhood. It is on MOTI land and not contained within the property of 850 Fisher Rd. Inside this shipping there will be hundreds of gallons of the industrial chemical Sodium Hypochlorite. Needless to say, there is outrage in the neighborhood after learning about this plan on Friday, just days before the installation was to take place. There was an impromptu SCRD meeting tonight that was put together in an attempt to quell the outrage in my neighborhood by some of the residents who have been made aware. I have made several attempts to contact the SCRD for answers to my questions regarding this plan which shows so little regard for my community. There, simply, was not enough time given in the meeting to answer all the questions and the answers that were given did not satiate my concerns over safety and preservation of my neighborhood. Here are some additional questions I have after tonight's meeting: New questions regarding Safety: 1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system. 2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 3. What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 4. You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and Worksafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe? 5. Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected? 6. What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? Other: 1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along? 2. What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St? 3. Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are. 4. There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive? on Linkedin Email The SCRD is planning on placing a 20ft long shipping container at the corner of Fisher Rd. and Elphinstone Ave. It sits atop the hill at the pinnacle of Historic Grantham's Landing and in view of nearly all 100 homes in our precious neighborhood. It is on MOTI land and not contained within the property of 850 Fisher Rd. Inside this shipping there will be hundreds of gallons of the industrial chemical Sodium Hypochlorite. Needless to say, there is outrage in the neighborhood after learning about this plan on Friday, just days before the installation was to take place. There was an impromptu SCRD meeting tonight that was put together in an attempt to quell the outrage in my neighborhood by some of the residents who have been made aware. I have made several attempts to contact the SCRD for answers to my questions regarding this plan which shows so little regard for my community. There, simply, was not enough time given in the meeting to answer all the questions and the answers that were given did not satiate my concerns over safety and preservation of my neighborhood. Here are some additional questions I have after tonight's meeting: New questions regarding Safety: 1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system. 2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 3. What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 4. You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and Worksafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe? 5. Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected? 6. What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? Other: 1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along? 2. What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St? 3. Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are. 4. There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive? link

    The SCRD is planning on placing a 20ft long shipping container at the corner of Fisher Rd. and Elphinstone Ave. It sits atop the hill at the pinnacle of Historic Grantham's Landing and in view of nearly all 100 homes in our precious neighborhood. It is on MOTI land and not contained within the property of 850 Fisher Rd. Inside this shipping there will be hundreds of gallons of the industrial chemical Sodium Hypochlorite. Needless to say, there is outrage in the neighborhood after learning about this plan on Friday, just days before the installation was to take place. There was an impromptu SCRD meeting tonight that was put together in an attempt to quell the outrage in my neighborhood by some of the residents who have been made aware. I have made several attempts to contact the SCRD for answers to my questions regarding this plan which shows so little regard for my community. There, simply, was not enough time given in the meeting to answer all the questions and the answers that were given did not satiate my concerns over safety and preservation of my neighborhood. Here are some additional questions I have after tonight's meeting: New questions regarding Safety: 1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system. 2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 3. What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 4. You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and Worksafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe? 5. Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected? 6. What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? Other: 1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along? 2. What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St? 3. Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are. 4. There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive?

    Sean asked 4 months ago

    New questions regarding Safety:

    1. We have been informed that there are vents in the shipping container. In the event of a leak inside the shipping container, what will become of the harmful vapours that are found present in bleach? Will they escape into our neighbourhood? The vapours are known to cause irritation or damage to the throat (esophagus), eyes, and respiratory system.   

    In the event of a leak, the de-chlorination pucks in the spill containment unit will ensure that the hypochlorite is neutralized and does not result in the release of hazardous vapours. The fans will vent any vapours released when the pump is moved from barrel to barrel.  The fans will also regulate the temperature in the container to avoid any off gassing of hypochlorite from the barrels. 

    2. Have all the surrounding neighbours been notified of your plan and given a chance to respond? The liquid and gases have an ability to travel quickly downhill given the steep terrain. 

    The storage in specially designed container, the spill containment within the containerand the parking lot grading, will ensure that the sodium hypochlorite will not result in a hazardous situation for the community. 

    3.   What will happen in the event of a leak or spill? Are there any situations where an evacuation order or other safety directions could be given to neighbours due to the presence of the chlorine and, if so, have the surrounding neighbours been notified of the dangers and procedures necessary in the event of a spill? 

    The SCRD is very familiar with the risks associated with Chlorine and have therefore phased out its use as part of the treatment of drinking water. Instead, the SCRD is using sodium hypochlorite at all its facilities, including at the Church Road Well FieldSodium Hypochlorite is a water-based non-flammable liquid and there are no dangers or procedures that require any of the suggested actions be taken  

    4.  You have previously stored 10.8% Sodium Hypochlorite solution in the parking pad of 850 Fisher Road in an unsecured manner in direct sunlight. This goes against Canadian Centre for Occupational Safe and Healthy and WorkSafe BC regulations. Why did this happen and why are we to now, suddenly, believe that your new storage methods are safe?   

    In 2024 WorkSafeBC responded to the reported conditions and no orders were written to the SCRD to remediate any safety concerns. At that time, the operational requirement to provide adequate drinking water to the Chapman Creek Water System required that we, on an interim basis, have the materials onsite despite not having the full safety measures in place.  The container is part of the full safety measures that are now being implemented.  

    5.  Why is chlorination happening in a densely populated residential neighbourhood at all? Why is it not happening at another pump station that is in a safer area in less closer proximity to so many homes? What other options were explored and why weren’t they selected?  

    Just like for all SCRD water sources, the Church Road WTP was designed to meet the regulatory requirements by having onsite chlorination of the water.  

    6.  What does the SCRD have to say to the immediate neighbours surrounding the water treatment plant who have continued distress over the immediate proximity and danger that the storage of this industrial chemical has posed to us? What can the SCRD do to relocate this to a less dangerous position? 

    The long-term storage and use of onsite Sodium Hypochlorite at the treatment plant will meet all regulatory requirements for the storage and use of this chemical. As indicated above, the facility was designed with onsite chlorination. The stored amount would be sufficient for approximately 2-3 weeks. Without this storage, deliveries would be required every couple of days. Onsite storage provides a lower risk to the community than such very frequent delivery would.

    Other Questions:

    1. Another resident who attended tonight’s meeting brought up the fact that chlorination of water has been a practice that has been going on for a very long time. Why was a shipping container parked on the parking pad not part of the original plan? What changed between the original design of the water treatment plant and what you are proposing today which is another 20ft storage container? How could this have been overlooked? Or was it the intent of the SCRD to store barrels outside of pump station building all along?   

    Only during the commissioning of the facility early summer 2022, was it identified that the required sodium hypochlorite storage capacity inside the building was underestimated in the design of the facility.  This triggered the need for additional onsite storage capacity in a purpose-built container. 

    The SCRD is committed to discuss options with the neighbouring residents to improve the visual appearance of this storage container. 

    2.  What is the storage capacity IN the building? If you continue to use 10.8% Sodium Hydrochloride, how long of a supply could be held inside the walls of 850 Fisher St?   

    The internal storage capacity in the facility is the equivalent of 2 barrels of 6% sodium hypochlorite solution. This is sufficient for 2-3 days of drinking water production depending on the actual water use by the community.  Higher concentration solutions have been ruled out at this facility due to operational/system requirements.  

     3.  Why can’t the minimum amount of Sodium Hypochlorite be stored in the building and the remainder off-site and delivered as needed? Please give a detailed answer so we can fully understand what the limitations are.  

    Not storing materials onsite would result in near daily deliveries to the facility.  These daily deliveries pose a greater risk to staff who have to handle the barrels, more deliveries mean a greater risk of spills and risk to the community, and increased traffic to and from the facility. Without storage onsite, a road accident, ferry delay, or any other incident could result in the facility shutting down, risking water shortages to the entire community.  

    4.   There was a landscaping plan in place done by the SCRD during the community consultation - it was part of the pitch that the SCRD made to get approval on the variances it received by MOTI to lessen the visual impact of the commercial building and lock-block wall being plunked into a residential neighbourhood. The landscaping plan included Salal, Red elderberry, Juniper, Kinnikinnik, sword ferns, and other plant species native to the area. Why hasn’t the SCRD followed through with their promises on this? How much were the quotes that the SCRD received from bidders that were deemed too expensive?  

    Implementation of the draft landscaping plan that was presented to the community was postponed as it was considered too cost-prohibitive at that time. The SCRD is committed to improving the landscaping later in 2024. 

  • Share What is the current operational status of this eight million dollar project? on Facebook Share What is the current operational status of this eight million dollar project? on Twitter Share What is the current operational status of this eight million dollar project? on Linkedin Email What is the current operational status of this eight million dollar project? link

    What is the current operational status of this eight million dollar project?

    Al Jenkins asked 8 months ago

    The Chapman Water System is currently being supplied by Chapman Lake. The Church Road Well is not currently being used because it is a water supply source during periods of drought, similar to Chaster Well or Gray Creek that also supply the Chapman Water System through summer and into fall if needed.

  • Share August 23, 2023, What is the number of lites per 24 hours being produced from the Church Road Well? Is this the full amount being contributed to the Chapman system? on Facebook Share August 23, 2023, What is the number of lites per 24 hours being produced from the Church Road Well? Is this the full amount being contributed to the Chapman system? on Twitter Share August 23, 2023, What is the number of lites per 24 hours being produced from the Church Road Well? Is this the full amount being contributed to the Chapman system? on Linkedin Email August 23, 2023, What is the number of lites per 24 hours being produced from the Church Road Well? Is this the full amount being contributed to the Chapman system? link

    August 23, 2023, What is the number of lites per 24 hours being produced from the Church Road Well? Is this the full amount being contributed to the Chapman system?

    Karl Glackmeyer asked 11 months ago

    Thank you for your interest. Church Road has been producing more than 2,600 m3/day  I have included a supply source graph, as well this is the most recent Water Supply update:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2HpCNdgOhQ 

    Hope this information helps. 

Page last updated: 27 Jun 2024, 02:31 PM